Introduction: How to become a Magento Master

Written by Guido Jansen in
September 2010

This week, a new intern started at my work: Voskan Martirosian. He's in his 3rd year of the study 'Digital Communication' and will work with us for the next 6 months. He's quite familiar with all sorts of online stuff but new to e-commerce and Magento. He is eager to learn all about Magento and in the following months he will manage some projects, develop business ideas for Magento shops after they go live and will be introduced to Magento and usability testing. In other words: We will make him a Magento Master! (and hopefully, a Magento enthusiast and evangelist... ;))

And why is this great for you? Well, we thought it would be a cool idea to share this 'creation' of a Magento Master with you! On this blog we will do a series of ((bi-)weekly) posts in which I will give Voskan some tips/ tricks/ tasks/ advice. Voskan will respond to my posts telling us what he's been doing, how my tips helped him (or didn't...) and where he needs some help. This way we create an online dialogue with (hopefully) many hands-on tips on how to become a Magento Master. To be clear: Voskan won't do any development, so the series won't contain any tips on coding but will mainly focus on Magento features, functionality, (project) management and more general e-commerce and usability subjects. In the next post, Voskan will introduce himself to kickoff the 'How to become a Magento Master course. If you already have some suggestions for him, give him your tips in the comments!

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