One year .com in retrospect

Written by Guido Jansen in
July 2011

Although I've been blogging in English for quite some years now, today one year ago I switched my website from being local (guidojansen.nl since 2001) to global (gxjansen.com). It feels much more logical to have a .com instead of a .nl when you blog for an international audience right?

Note: in December 2017, the website was moved to gui.do

I had no idea up-front if this would indeed broaden my audience but when I look at my Google Analytics stats I think that the switch was a great success!

Improved statistics

Before this year 39% of my visitors came from outside of The Netherlands, but last year, this increased to 83%! And not only did the ratio change, also traffic in general increased by 470%! It's also great to see a larger percentage of returning visitors, lower bounce rates, more pages are being visited with every visit and doubled time-on-site.

For me enough reasons to believe it was a good choice to switch to a .com domain and to continue adding even more awesome blogposts! :)

Some other stats for those who're interested:

Around 5% of my visitors uses a mobile device (and uses the mobile-optimized version of my website). Most popular browsers are Firefox (48%) and Chrome (28%), the most popular OS is Windows (65%) followed by Mac (21%).

Biggest traffic sources:

  1. Google (organic)
  2. Direct
  3. Magento.com
  4. RSS feeds
  5. Twitter

The most popular posts for this year:

  1. 101 ways to speed up your Magento e-commerce website
  2. Want a Quora invite?
  3. Magento Master E-course
  4. The Psychology of E-commerce
  5. Update: 101 ways to optimize Magento for speed
Recent posts
Announcing a new Magento community project
Announcing a new Magento community project

I would like to share a new project with you. I’ve had this idea for over 5 years now and I’ve finally been able to make it a reality in the last couple of weeks.

Can you afford not to know? Can you afford to be wrong?
Can you afford not to know? Can you afford to be wrong?

In rapid changing online environments, continues business experimentation is a great way of constantly learning what works and what doesn’t. But then the question might arise: how far do you go? What do you test? And is it sometimes ok NOT to test something?